Would You Pay $500+ Per Car in Overspray Claims?

“For obvious reasons, it’s not a great situation to be in if you are the person that created the overspray.”

“According to insurance claims experts, more than 1,000 vehicles a day are damaged with paint overspray, resulting in damage claims in excess of $500 million annually. The problem with quoting statistics is that they don’t always give the full picture. If a professional painter causes overspray damage to your car, they are usually liable to pay for damages.”

“However, there’s the little problem of actually getting paid. Unfortunately, not all painters carry insurance. It’s expensive. So to make these policies affordable, some companies offer cut-rate discount contractor insurance. So some painters have insurance that excludes paint overspray claims to keep the premium costs affordable.”

“Even if a painter does have paint overspray coverage, many insurance companies now include per claim deductibles above $500. This means the painter will be paying out of pocket up to $500 per car. Unfortunately, you might have to pay your deductible or the full cost of the paint overspray removal.”

How much does it cost to remove overspray?

“The typical cost to remove paint overspray from a vehicle ranges in price from a low of $150 to a high of $500 or more. These rates are standard for professional detailers or reconditioning techs. The price you pay will greatly depend on the size of the vehicle, the severity of the overspray damage, and where it’s located on the vehicle.”

“For example, is it just the windshield or is it covering the entire vehicle? And if it’s everywhere, is it a Kia compact or a Yukon Denali XL SUV? Obviously the price points will be wildly different depending on those types of differences.”

“Another criteria that often affects overspray removal prices, is the type of surface. Removing paint overspray from glass windows is measurably less difficult than removing it from body paint or plastic trim.” — Auto Beauty Center

“The most common place to get overspray on your car is a body shop”

“Why? Simple… because they spray paint at body shops, and not just in the enclosed paint booth. Even if they only sprayed paint inside the paint booth, overspray is still a problem because:”

A: Airborne sticky particles of fresh paint can travel and land everywhere and anywhere.

B: Not all shops tape-off and cover-up 100% of the portions of a car NOT being painted. For example if painting a fender, some shops won’t tape-off and cover all the other parts of the car like the back wheels, or back of car, etc. Overspray paint is non-selective, it drifts in the air and sticks wherever it lands.

“So… The most common place to get overspray on your car is a body shop” — Mike Phillips, Auto Detailing Director of Training

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